A big week for politics (and football)

I’m one of those people who listens every morning to the Today Programme (even when I’m in Australia), follows political commentators on Twitter, and who in general feels up to date with politics. However, this week it’s been hard to keep up both on the national level but also here in Good Things Foundation world.

A very French outing

At the end of last week, I sat on a panel at the Local Government Authority conference in Birmingham with three other people, including Debbie Brown, Transformation Director at Salford City Council – a key player in our Digital You project.

From Birmingham, I zoomed off to Paris to attend the France UK Digital Colloque, a meeting of the UK and French digital ministers where they agreed to join forces and share expertise on AI and research, working together to improve digital services, collaborating to develop tech talent. I sat on a panel with some very inspirational women in tech where we discussed inclusion and diversity. It was a great event and I appreciated being invited by Matt Hancock, though this ended up being my last outing with him as Digital Minister.

Digital Colloque

At the France UK Digital Colloque with Debbie Forster and Claire Calmejane

 

This leads me on to…

Following the resignation of some of the Conservative Cabinet the then Secretary of State for DCMS (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) Matt Hancock became the new Secretary of State for Health, with Jeremy Wright replacing him as SoS at DCMS.

Welcome to Mr Wright and I hope he gets the importance of driving digital inclusion and basic digital skills as much as his predecessor did. The team here at Good Things Foundation are very excited to develop our relationship and work together to help the country reach its digital potential.

And of course we’re keen to keep working with Matt Hancock – our work on Health and Digital/Social Inclusion is now in its second phase and we’re innovating with CCGs and others around the country – something I’m sure the new Secretary of State at Health will be interested in.

And finally…

I was one of those people who on Wednesday night sat on their sofa and shouted at the telly to encourage our football team. We were all a little blue in the Good Things Foundation office yesterday after England’s defeat to Croatia in the World Cup semi-final.

Luckily, we were holding a workshop in the office for the Online Centres who are delivering our Voicebox Cafes project – that’s giving women a voice in democracy – being run with Helen Jones MP, the Chair of Parliament’s Petitions Committee. This cheered everyone up, as we’re always happy to meet the amazing people who work in Online Centres and we were honoured to have Helen Jones in our offices working with us and the centres.

The workshop was going great… then it got even better when Sheffield Lord Mayor Magid Magid and comedian and actor Rufus Hound turned up with some ‘World Cup commiseration’ sweets to cheer everyone up on their Sheffield #SweetTweetTour. Magid even managed to come in and speak to the people in the workshop and meet Helen Jones.

Workshop

Magid meets Helen Jones MP

 

It was good fun and great to see members of the Green Party and the Labour Party getting along so well!

An interesting week in politics – which has moved onto the Donald Trump visit (which I won’t comment on here).

A slightly surreal rollercoaster of a week but one that ended with the Good Things Foundation team posing for a great photo with Magid and Rufus Hound, and eating Skittles and Haribo. What more could we ask for?

SweetTweet

An unexpected surprise

Happy birthday NHS – let’s embrace more digital to evolve and get even better

At Good Things Foundation we’ve been very pleased this week to celebrate the 70th birthday of the NHS. We’ve blogged and published guest blogs, we launched a report (about our pilot project with the Sheffield Perfect Patient Pathway Testbed looking at the digital capabilities of health professionals), and we’ve shared lots of great stories on social media. But as the NHS hits this great milestone, it’s got me thinking, how can we sustain it going forward and can digital play a bigger part?

Innovation isn’t just sexy tech and apps

The first phase of our Widening Digital Participation programme proved that online health information – and importantly, ensuring people having the digital skills to access that information – can have a significant positive impact on people’s lives. We reached hundreds of thousands of people with those digital health skills and found that this behaviour change could save the NHS lots of valuable cash (£6m a year through channel shift eg. using more appropriate and more convenient channels).

The point is, the thing that made the most difference to the learners was the information. There’s so much talk out there about different technologies modernising healthcare but the reality is it isn’t all about sexy tech and apps. People need information to get them started in the world of digital health.

Dr Ollie Hart, a GP based in Sheffield who you may recognise from some of our Widening Digital Participation communications, is working hard to make sure people have the knowledge to use online information to manage their conditions in a safe way. He’s embedded signposting to basic digital information in partnership with a local Online Centre who has been based in the GP’s surgery once a week for the past four years.

One of our first Pathfinders in Phase 2 of the Widening Digital Participation programme is a project in Islington working with young people with mental health needs. The project took the relatively simple step of putting a PDF of young people’s Crisis Care Plans on their mobile phones. It was previously on paper and was often lost or forgotten about.  This solution meant that the Crisis Care Plan was in easy reach whenever the young person needed it. Digital was the solution, but it was very low tech.

As Juliet Bauer, Chief Digital Officer at NHS England, says “Technology is here to extend humanity not replace it.”

Digital can bring so much to the prevention piece

Too often the conversations I’m part of about Health and Digital tend to be almost all about curing people. But for better health for more people and for people to not get sick in the first place then digital has a big role to play in prevention as well as cure.

We have many stories of people who have lost weight by getting support from other dieters online or by using the internet to find easy recipes – and therefore preventing a number of illnesses associated with being overweight or obese.

In June, in Sheffield (where I live), there’s a Move More campaign that got me walking 30 minutes to work and back because of a simple app on my phone and a league table where organisations compete against one another to do the most active minutes per person.

But it is getting the people involved that is crucial. Our Pathfinders show time and again that people need to help design their own solutions – whether this is an old butcher shop turned digital health information centre in Nailsea or better access to healthcare for homeless people in Hastings.

Screen Shot 2018-07-06 at 13.55.29

Digital is a tool that helps to drive behaviour change – and that behaviour change means individual people making better decisions about keeping healthy rather than waiting until poor health strikes.

It’s about making people feel healthier and better

This week has been such a huge milestone and I’ve seen and heard so many great things in the news about our national treasure. It makes me proud.

I’d also like to say a big thank you to the people at the NHS who are working with us to test some new approaches and to see what works (and what doesn’t). Thank you to all of the people in the NHS, in the CCGs, and the GPs involved. Thank you to Nicola Gill (who wrote a great guest blog this week), Juliet Bauer, and Bob Gann, who have helped to drive this initiative forward.

The NHS will hit 80 in ten years, and there’s no doubt that it will be a big decade for digital – in making the NHS even better, more accessible, more convenient and flexible, There will be many more opportunities to create services with people, not just for people.

In the UK there are still over 11 million people who aren’t proficient at filling in an online form or downloading an app – our mission is to help all of them to be confident at using the web for good, and to have better lives, and that’s going to be really important for the NHS in the next decade and beyond. Let’s not forget these millions of people as we design the next tech innovation and as we embrace the next ten years of an even better NHS.

Happy Birthday, NHS. And thank you.

#NHS70